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Happy Fall 2018 all!

Students have returned to campus, classes are back in session, and Franklin Street is bustling. I don’t know about you, but the beginning of the fall semester has always been my favorite time of the year on campus! Today also marks the first meeting of the Fall 2018 cohort of Gil Interns. Keep reading for an overview of the 12 interns working with us this semester. Make sure to check back each week for updates from the interns!

 

 

 

 

Brianna is a senior from Elon, North Carolina pursuing a double major in Psychology and Interdisciplinary studies with a minor in Social and Economic Justice. Her research interests include examining cultural differences in treatment and diagnoses of mental health disorders in minority populations. Over the past year, Brianna has worked as a research assistant in Dr. Enrique Neblett’s African-American Youth Wellness Lab, which is dedicated to examining differences in African American youths’ responses to racism-related stress experiences. She also serves as  a research assistant for the Center for Health Equity Research. Upon graduating, Brianna plans to attend graduate school in pursuit of a dual degree in MPH-Ph.D. Clinical Psychology.

 

 

 

 

 

Anna is a junior from Fishers, Indiana and is pursuing a major in Psychology with a minor in Neuroscience. She is interested in the neural underpinning of behaviors and cognition of individuals diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Since her first year at Carolina, she has been involved with the TEACCH Autism Program. During the past year, Anna has assisted with the research of a new intervention program titled T-STEP (TEACCH – School Transition to Employment and Post-secondary Education). After graduating, she hopes to obtain a Ph.D. in Clinical Neuropsychology.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bethany is a senior from Greenville, North Carolina, majoring in Psychology with minors in Creative Writing and Medical Anthropology. Since her freshman year, she has been a research assistant in the Penn Labb, which examines social cognition and psychosocial treatment for schizophrenia. Most recently in the lab, Bethany has been working on a project that focuses on the impact of race and perceived racism on human cognition. After graduating from UNC, she will pursue research regarding the role of narrative in pscyhotherapy processes and a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology.

 

 

 

 

 

Taylor is a senior from Charlotte, North Carolina with a double-major in Psychology and Biology and a minor in Social and Economic Justice. Within psychology, she is particularly interested in the field of clinical psychology where there is a tremendous focus on patient care, diagnosis, and treatment. She is passionate about effectively implement cultural competency within mental healthcare and providing equal access to health services for patients with varying intersecting identities. Taylor is also fascinated by the relationship between the psychological treatment of mental illness and the medical treatment of physical ailment, and how these two realms connect within overall healthcare. After graduating, she plans to attend medical school to become a psychiatrist.

 

 

 

 

 

Connor is a senior from Gastonia, North Carolina with a double-major in Psychology and Communication Studies and a minor in History. He currently serves as a Research Assistant and Assistant Study Coordinator in Dr. Kristen Lindquist’s Carolina Affective Science Lab, where he investigates the relationship of peripheral physiology with emotional beliefs and body awareness to predict emotional reactions during a stressful event. As an undergraduate, Connor has become interested in social psychology and how affect, social cognition, and group processes interact to affect performance in the workplace. After graduation, he plans to pursue a graduate degree in Industrial and Organizational Psychology.

 

 

 

 

 

Elena is a senior majoring in Psychology and Communication Studies from Tryon, North Carolina. She is particularly interested in utilizing research on workplace motivations and reward systems in order to gain knowledge on solutions of consistent problems that arise in organizations. Over the past year, Elena has worked as a Research Assistant in Dr. Sara Algoe’s Everyday Social Behaviors and Health Study that examines the relationship between healthiness in romantic relationships and physical/emotional health. In addition, she works as a Research Assistant for several studies at the UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School’s Behavioral Laboratory. After graduating, Elena plans to pursue a graduate degree in Industrial and Organizational Psychology.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Elissa is a junior from Charlotte, North Carolina double-majoring in Psychology and Global Studies with a concentration in Global Health. Elissa is currently a Research Assistant in Dr. Stacey Daughters’ Biobehavioral Research on Addiction and Emotion (BRANE) Lab where she assists with studies that investigate the factors that contribute to the development and continuation of substance use disorders to develop effective interventions. Concurrently, she works at the Water Institute in the Gillings School of Global Public Health and is conducting a systematic review on environmental health conditions in prisons. Following graduation, she hopes to earn a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jessie is a senior from Ypsilanti, Michigan majoring in Psychology with minors in Neuroscience and Education. This past year, she has worked in two laboratories, including the Classroom Memory Study where she investigates the role of teacher language on children’s memory and UNC TEACCH where she helped to progress autism research. Jessie is interested in the intersection between cognitive and developmental psychology, specifically how developmental disabilities impact individuals’ motor, social, and cognitive development. After graduation, she hopes to pursue a Ph.D. in Clinical Neuropsychology, specializing in pediatrics.

 

 

 

Kelsey is a junior from Denver, North Carolina majoring in Psychology with a minor in Hispanic Studies. Through various jobs and volunteer opportunities, she discovered her passion for child psychology. Kelsey is primarily interested in the environmental and neurological factors that contribute to healthy development or developmental disabilities. She works as a Research Assistant in Dr. Eva Telzer’s Developmental Social Neuroscience Lab, studying parent and peer influences on adolescent decision-making and attitudes at the behavioral and neural levels. After graduation, Kelsey plans to pursue a graduate degree in counseling or clinical psychology.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carol is a junior from Charlotte, North Carolina majoring in Psychology with a double minor in Chemistry and Art History. For the past year, she has served as a Research Assistant for Dr. Mitch Prinstein’s Peer Relations Lab, focusing on stress in adolescents and now is a Research Assistant for the Women’s Health Study in the UNC Department of Anesthesiology, where she assesses the chronic pain and trauma of sexual assault survivors. Carol hopes to become a psychiatrist to bridge the gap in mental health awareness among Asian Americans. Her passion in psychology comes from her own experiences with mental health and the research previously conducted on adolescent depression and its adverse implications on coping with stress.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jessica  is a senior from Greensboro, North Carolina. She is double majoring in Psychology and Anthropology with a minor in Hispanic Studies and has been working as a Research Assistant in Dr. Mitch Prinstein’s Peer Relations Lab for the past year. In addition, Jessica is an intern and volunteer at Kidzu Children’s Museum with the Adaptive Play Program for children with special needs. She is interested in working with children and adolescents in the future as a licensed clinical social worker. Her research and clinical interests are family and peer relationships as predictors of adolescent suicidal thoughts and behaviors, depression, and anxiety.

 

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